No Bias. No Influence. Just the Facts. For Stories That Matter to Brampton.

Finding reason and balance in Brampton’s suburban bliss as the threat of climate change looms

Finding reason and balance in Brampton’s suburban bliss as the threat of climate change looms

For generations, the single-family home has been the holy grail of housing: a status symbol that has permeated the societal mindset and created wide, sprawling expanses of suburbia across the GTA, including Brampton. Data shows that the desire to own such a home has been passed on to the millennial generation. Nearly 60 percent of millennials could be on the hunt for a new home in the GTA by 2026.

That desire is on a collision course with the reality painted by the most recent report from the United Nations International Panel on Climate Change. Our way of life needs to change drastically—and fast—if the planet is to avoid catastrophic damage.

A new report from Ryerson University describes one potential solution, but grasping it may involve a massive shift in how we think about what makes a home.



Peel Police Chief Jennifer Evans to step down in January

Peel Police Chief Jennifer Evans to step down in January

Controversial Peel Police Chief Jennifer Evans announced Friday that she will be leaving the force in January. She informed the police board that oversees her of the pending resignation two months after it approved a probe of Evans' conduct by a police watchdog for the bungled investigation into three Mississauga family members who were found dead years apart. 

After battling the board for much of the past four years, over issues such as carding, a practice she has strongly defended, Evans was given a two-year extension last year. But she announced that she will depart early in the coming new year.



Brampton citizens, politicians and experts respond to Ford government plan to exempt Sikh-Canadians from wearing motorcycle helmets

Brampton citizens, politicians and experts respond to Ford government plan to exempt Sikh-Canadians from wearing motorcycle helmets

It's a controversial issue: how do you balance Canadian values and laws protecting religious accommodation with saftey and fairness concerns that surround the Ford government plan to exempt Sikh-Canadians from wearing motorcycle helmets?

Local MPP Prabmeet Sarkaria, a turban-wearing Sikh, was a driving force behind the move announced by Ford in Brampton yesterday. In a place where Sikh-Canadians make up such a huge part of the city's fabric, The Pointer asked citizens here, politicians and experts what they think of the move by Ontario's government. 



Bill Davis throws his support behind Patrick Brown

Bill Davis throws his support behind Patrick Brown

Patrick Brown gets a bump, after former Ontario premier and legendary Brampton politician Bill Davis "officially" showed his support for Brown, incumbent Linda Jeffrey's main rival, at an event Tuesday evening.

In what some are already calling a surprise move, after Davis backed Jeffrey four years ago, the show of support might prove significant in an already close mayoral race between the two clear front-runners.



Andrew Scheer arrives in India; joins list of Brampton/Canadian politicians unwilling to address country’s appalling human rights record

Andrew Scheer arrives in India; joins list of Brampton/Canadian politicians unwilling to address country’s appalling human rights record

The leader of the federal Conservative party is in India on a mission to “repair and strengthen” Canada’s relationship, following a controversial trip early in the year by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

But human rights won't be on the agenda. The Pointer asked Scheer if issues such as the widespread rape of women, attacks against religious minorities and the barbaric treatment of hundreds of millions of India’s “lower caste” residents would be addressed.

As is the case when Brampton politicians and other officials go there, human rights seems to be out of bounds. Canada’s position with India is inconsistent with its stance toward other countries, despite conditions that human rights groups describe as alarming and getting worse.



Meet the Brampton businessman who serves up tasty food while helping predict the next mayor

Meet the Brampton businessman who serves up tasty food while helping predict the next mayor

Jeff Chalmers thinks political engagement is the key to making positive decisions for the city's future. His unscientific polling method, to get people involved, has street cred. In fact, he has literally taken his form of surveying to the streets, in his mobile chrome eatery that serves up food-to-go while gauging the political pulse of the city.

Chalmers wants citizens to get interested in the decision-making process that impacts their daily lives. There's no better way to pull them in than food. With political polling being an inexact science that has, over the years, employed thousands of people and cost millions of dollars, The Pointer asked Chalmers, over a plate of one of his famous dishes, about the latest results from his recent poll, which asked patrons who they would pick in the race to be Brampton's mayor. You might be surprised by what he found.



Linda Jeffrey: Why I want to lead Brampton again

Linda Jeffrey: Why I want to lead Brampton again

An op-ed by incumbent mayor Linda Jeffrey on why she wants Brampton voters to re-elect her in the October 22 municipal election. She makes her case to The Pointer's readers.



It’s time for city leaders to take Brampton’s healthcare crisis seriously

It’s time for city leaders to take Brampton’s healthcare crisis seriously

Ontario’s healthcare dollars should be distributed according to numbers and need. So why has Brampton – one of the fastest growing cities in Canada – been shortchanged, again?

Why isn’t part of the $90 million being handed out by the Ford government at Queen’s Park to help eliminate ‘Hallway Healthcare’ going to the city where the phrase was popularized in the first place?



City’s Conservative MPPs silent on why their government’s plan to fix hallway healthcare ignores Brampton

City’s Conservative MPPs silent on why their government’s plan to fix hallway healthcare ignores Brampton

Bramptonians have been looking to the provincial government for help to solve bottlenecks in the healthcare system that have led to bed shortages and hallway medicine at the city’s only full-service hospital, but it was ignored in a new funding plan announced Wednesday. 

While the Ontario government’s growth targets for Peel Region continue to push Brampton’s population to a breaking point, Queen’s Park seems disconnected from the resulting problems, such as the city’s healthcare crisis.

With more than 4,300 Brampton Civic Hospital patients treated in hallways in 2016 The Pointer asked the two new Progressive Conservative MPPs, Prabmeet Sarkaria and Amarjot Sandhu, how they are representing Brampton’s interests inside their government as the healthcare crisis continues. They didn’t have much to say.



Premier Doug Ford’s healthcare announcement offers next to nothing for Brampton

Premier Doug Ford’s healthcare announcement offers next to nothing for Brampton

No part of Wednesday’s provincial government announcement of $90 million—$10 million less than the Liberal government under Kathleen Wynne offered at the start of the last flu season—will go toward relieving the crisis at overloaded, overcrowded Brampton Civic Hospital, whose rash of “hallway medicine” stories helped turn the problem into a provincial election issue last spring.

Nor is there any indication of how many of the promised extra long-term care beds will come to one of Canada’s fastest-growing cities, whose rapidly expanding healthcare needs and the urgency of fixing them already form a major issue in the upcoming municipal election.



Patrick Brown promises better GO Train service, transit funding to combat increasing traffic congestion

Patrick Brown promises better GO Train service, transit funding to combat increasing traffic congestion

If elected mayor, Patrick Brown pledged during a Thursday morning announcement to ease the city's crippling traffic. His plan touched on many issues Brampton residents have raised for decades, such as securing all-day, two-way GO Train service, but he offered few details about how he will actually achieve the ambitious set of promises he outlined. 

In a recent poll commissioned by The Pointer, reducing traffic congestion was the number one issue respondents chose, when asked what they want council to focus on during the upcoming term. 



For Trudeau, Brampton and all of Canada, free trade is good, especially when we open new doors

For Trudeau, Brampton and all of Canada, free trade is good, especially when we open new doors

The new-look North American free trade agreement fixes some, but not all of the inequities in the original NAFTA, and eases the tensions for the business community in Brampton. But at the macro level, Canada is trying to create a new-style business model that is impervious to American interests and Donald Trump’s bully-boy tactics. The new deal provides motivation for local and national companies to take stock of opportunities around the world, for them and our well-educated, dynamic workforce.



The dirty, sweaty, political life of a municipal councillor as the job description evolves

The dirty, sweaty, political life of a municipal councillor as the job description evolves

In recent weeks, the idea of effective representation has been thrust into the spotlight as Premier Doug Ford took a legislative axe to Toronto City Council. Can 25 people effectively represent almost three million constituents? Municipal councils across the GTA, whose members find their workload growing as the region booms, are struggling with the same question. Nowhere is this more clear than in Brampton, the second fastest growing city in Canada. What do we need here to feel effectively represented by our local elected officials?

Do we want them answering endless calls about snow on sidewalks and the annual pothole hysteria; or do we want them addressing complex urban planning issues and how to handle the challenges of modern policing? Or do we expect them to do it all? Speaking with councillors across the GTA, from Oshawa to Brampton, it’s apparent that people who hold the position often see the role differently.



Disqualified bid was $95M less than the $205M for city hall extension; building is short of promised space, trial hears

Disqualified bid was $95M less than the $205M for city hall extension; building is short of promised space, trial hears

Evidence presented recently at trial by a company that alleges it was unfairly disqualified from a $500-million downtown development deal shows Inzola Group’s bid to build the city hall extension was a little more than half the $205 million being paid by the City of Brampton for the building.  

Evidence also suggests the finished building does not provide the amount of required administrative space detailed in the bid contract for the deal.



Brampton auto workers breathe huge sigh of relief as tentative U.S.-Canada-Mexico trade deal reached

Brampton auto workers breathe huge sigh of relief as tentative U.S.-Canada-Mexico trade deal reached

Thousands of the city’s auto-sector workers were on pins and needles while U.S. President Donald Trump repeatedly threatened tariffs as high as 25 percent on Canadian-made autos, which could have crippled the industry. A new deal officially announced Monday, clears the way for Ontario’s huge auto industry to keep expanding.

News wasn’t as rosy for the agricultural sector, particularly dairy producers, including companies in Brampton. The new deal could see more than $700 million of additional foreign dairy products enter Canada annually.

But the agreement might bring relief to Brampton’s large aluminum and steel sector, which was hit hard by recent U.S. tariffs.



Will Brampton opt into legal marijuana shops? Officials say lots of unanswered questions about legal cannabis

Will Brampton opt into legal marijuana shops? Officials say lots of unanswered questions about legal cannabis

While Ontario Premier Doug Ford doesn’t appear to know where exactly his government will allow legal marijuana to be used once new rules come into effect next month, Brampton officials, including incumbent mayor Linda Jeffrey, aren’t even sure if the city will opt into plans to allow retail outlets next year.

Brampton’s diverse community groups, another council member says, will likely introduce a range of cultural values into what’s sure to be a complex debate on legal marijuana, one the city has not yet even initiated. With other GTA cities vowing to prevent pot sales, will a new council be ready to tackle this major issue?



Raucous debate puts Jeffrey’s struggle on centre stage

Raucous debate puts Jeffrey’s struggle on centre stage

Linda Jeffrey’s hopes to ease into re-election on Oct. 22 were shattered by the late entry onto the ballot of Patrick Brown.   

Jeffrey’s performance during a debate Tuesday, which included pointed attacks on Brown and references to the scandals that got him turfed as Ontario PC leader, often failed to convey the sense of a mayor ready to unite a city desperate for leadership.



This is what downtown Brampton could get if city hall fixes the decades-old flood problem

This is what downtown Brampton could get if city hall fixes the decades-old flood problem

Mississauga’s massive $1.5 billion M City project is just one of many 905 developments that Brampton’s stagnating downtown is missing out on without a firm commitment by city leaders to finally resolve the decades-old downtown flood problem.

Critics say Brampton will struggle to keep up with surrounding cities that are quickly shedding their status as suburban bedroom communities.

While places like Mississauga continue to boom, with constantly rising skylines, Brampton’s downtown remains hampered by strict floodplain restrictions that make it difficult to create a dynamic city centre.



Jeffrey won’t support city consultant’s new LRT plan

Jeffrey won’t support city consultant’s new LRT plan

Incumbent mayor Linda Jeffrey made her stance on the city’s current LRT study quite clear during a boisterous debate at Brampton’s Rose Theatre Tuesday night, calling alternative routes “foolish” and decrying the layout put forward in the ambitious Brampton 2040 Vision plan. 

The debate also saw mud-slinging from all sides with Jeffrey’s main contender Patrick Brown taking the chance to criticize the lack of foresight in Jeffrey’s adamant support for the Main Street route, which council already turned down, while pushing his repeatedly used campaign slogan that Brampton is not getting its fair share. 

  


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