No Bias. No Influence. Just the Facts. For Stories That Matter to Brampton.

Planned new war memorial delayed by Ken Whillans Square revitalization

Planned new war memorial delayed by Ken Whillans Square revitalization

Though it will come too late for last Sunday’s centenary of the end of World War I, a new memorial wall will provide a more fitting tribute to the 163 Bramptonians who have died fighting in Canada’s wars.

The project, the subject of a rare unanimous vote by city council, will be built in Ken Whillans Square once plans for a renewal project in that area are completed.

Meanwhile, the Royal Canadian Legion’s local branch is dreaming about what the project will look like when it’s finally erected next to the long-standing cenotaph.



Brown defiant and unapologetic at launch for tell-all memoir Takedown

Brown defiant and unapologetic at launch for tell-all memoir Takedown

Takedown: The Attempted Political Assassination of Patrick Brown was released at a Brampton launch party on Friday, already a top seller for its publisher.

The coming-out party at Carl’s Catering The Glen drew media, residents and the city elite, eager to hear how Brown expects to handle the fallout of his bridge-burning book about his meteoric rise and fall as leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative party.

Brown shrugged off concerns, saying he hadn’t made any new enemies with the book.



A Q&A with Patrick Brown on his tell-all book Take Down

A Q&A with Patrick Brown on his tell-all book Take Down

The newly elected mayor of Brampton reflects on his spectacular rise, fall and resurrection from the political ashes of last January’s sexual-misconduct allegations in a wide-ranging interview with The Pointer.

He talks about his support of the #MeToo movement despite being caught in the “eye of the storm”, the “catharsis” of writing a book, why he doesn’t care that it will burn a lot of bridges and what he hopes to do for the city as he returns to municipal politics.



Ford says Patrick Brown has the credibility of a “rock” amid furor over tell-all book

Ford says Patrick Brown has the credibility of a “rock” amid furor over tell-all book

Takedown: The Attempted Political Assassination of Patrick Brown, has raised a ruckus even before its bookstore launch this Friday, with its pull-no-punches invective against Tory caucus members who ousted him from the party leadership last January.

The anger on both sides is palpable but should come as no surprise to observers of the fraught party politics that surrounded Brown’s ascendancy to the Progressive Conservative leadership and his tumultuous fall from grace within hours of a CTV story that made allegations of sexual misconduct — allegations he continues to vigorously deny.



If Ford derails Hurontario LRT, Brampton's transit plans likely to stall

If Ford derails Hurontario LRT, Brampton's transit plans likely to stall

The Hurontario LRT is critical for bringing higher-order transit into the city of Brampton. Now it looks like the project may be on the chopping block.

Following discussions with ministry reps, the Ontario NDP transit critic says the government under Premier Doug Ford is refusing to deny rumours that the Hurontario LRT project is set to be cancelled.

While the Conservatives claim they have yet to make any decisions surrounding the future of the project, the uncertainty itself is not a good thing for Brampton.



Patrick Brown’s raw, candid account of events surrounding his rise and fall and rise captured in tell-all book

Patrick Brown’s raw, candid account of events surrounding his rise and fall and rise captured in tell-all book

Brampton’s mayor-elect has penned a remarkably revealing political exposé detailing the spellbinding circumstances that led to his public dismemberment following allegations of sexual misconduct.

He has vigorously denied the claims, and now details his version of the events that stripped him of the chance to be Ontario's next premier.

The Pointer will feature an exclusive interview Thursday with Brown, a day before the official launch, and an excerpt from the book, the complete chapter titled Night of Knives, this Saturday.



Brampton MPPs call out Amarjot Sandhu for missing crucial votes and silence on city’s big issues

Brampton MPPs call out Amarjot Sandhu for missing crucial votes and silence on city’s big issues

Missing the Remembrance Day ceremony at city hall was just the latest example of rookie PC MPP Amarjot Sandhu’s ghost-like presence.

Sandhu may have been elected to represent the interests of residents of Brampton, but he has either voted against legislation crucial to Bramptonians at Queen’s Park or been absent during such votes.

The Brampton West MPP has also been largely unavailable for inquiries from the media, to the point that his voice mailbox has been full for months.  



Unclear what Brampton will get from Ottawa’s $200M funding to combat gun and gang violence

Unclear what Brampton will get from Ottawa’s $200M funding to combat gun and gang violence

In the midst of Peel Region’s worst ever crime wave, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government is giving $200 million to provinces to help disrupt the inner workings of black-market gun sales and gang activity across the country.

An additional $86 million investment in the RCMP and the Canada Border Services Agency may make a difference, particularly in stemming the flow of guns over the border.

But despite a Brampton MP’s attempt to promote her government’s tough on crime initiative, it remains unclear how the city, currently reeling from a guns and gangs epidemic, will benefit directly from an infusion of badly needed funding as the city's violent crime problem continues to grow.



Will province miss the Brampton stop? Government provides few answers as LRT funding questions mount

Will province miss the Brampton stop? Government provides few answers as LRT funding questions mount

Among the many unresolved issues inside Queen’s Park that could deeply impact Brampton’s future, decisions about funding the city’s transit needs are among the most important. With huge potential to attract jobs and investment, higher order transit could be the catalyst to move the city forward.

But as traffic congestion becomes more crippling every day, it remains unclear if Doug Ford’s PC government will invest in Brampton’s transit needs, even if a new council under Mayor-elect Patrick Brown puts forward a decisive plan for the city’s future.



Brampton MPP Sara Singh accuses Premier Ford of covering up sexual misconduct scandal

Brampton MPP Sara Singh accuses Premier Ford of covering up sexual misconduct scandal

Three high-profile resignations by Conservative politicians and a staffer over allegations of inappropriate sexual behaviour in recent weeks, including MP Tony Clement’s admission of ‘sexting’ women, have Brampton MPP Sara Singh and others concerned about the conduct of men in the corridors of political power.

Singh lashed out at Premier Doug Ford inside Queen’s Park Monday, accusing him of trying to cover up the allegation against former PC MPP Jim Wilson, who resigned from cabinet and the party caucus two weeks ago, when officials claimed it was over “addiction issues”.



Long waits to file family court documents in Brampton

Long waits to file family court documents in Brampton

Wait times to file family court documents in Brampton’s Superior Court of Justice reached nearly five times the ministry standard earlier this year and remain among the longest in the GTA.

While a stiff increase in the number of people going to court without lawyers — and often struggling to figure out court bureaucracy — is a problem across the province, Brampton’s courthouse is particularly hard hit, frustrating court staff and ordinary litigants alike.

With no plans to increase staff or counters at the Hurontario Street court, it’s not clear when Bramptonians will see relief.



UPDATE: Clement admits to “infidelity” as sexting scandal grips Brampton

UPDATE: Clement admits to “infidelity” as sexting scandal grips Brampton

MP and former Brampton MPP Tony Clement, who retains deep ties to the city, issued a letter to his Parry Sound constituents Thursday evening apologizing for “acts of infidelity” to his wife and admitting that he “crossed lines that should never have been crossed.”

The open letter comes less than 48 hours after the news of the sexting scandal exploded, triggering Clement’s ouster from the Conservative caucus and his departure from a prominent position on Canada’s National Security Committee.

Clement’s wife, Lynne Golding, a Brampton native and prominent lawyer and author, issued her own statement on Wednesday, saying Clement would be “taking the action he needs to get help.”



Insurance industry insiders question Brampton MPP's claim of “postal code discrimination” against the city's drivers

Insurance industry insiders question Brampton MPP's claim of “postal code discrimination” against the city's drivers

While momentum builds for changes at Queen's Park to address Brampton's sky-high auto insurance rates, many who have been dealing with the issue for decades say some elected officials in the city are misrepresenting the facts. Higher rates of costly accidents, possibly due to excessive speeds that are allowed on many of the city's streets, can lead to more expensive insurance fees.

Other reasons not related to postcode discrimination could also contribute to Brampton's exorbitant auto insurance prices, according to some in the industry.



Oversight in Brampton will continue, whether councillors like it or not

Oversight in Brampton will continue, whether councillors like it or not

In a city that cannot afford any more reputational damage over controversy involving senior staff and council members, Guy Giorno’s decision to step down as integrity commissioner because of his long-time ties to Mayor-elect Patrick Brown leaves a hole that newly elected officials will need to fill, despite the sometimes uneasy relationship with the person who holds them accountable.

After a series of scandals in a number of large cities, new provincial law makes having an integrity commissioner mandatory in every Ontario municipality.

Meanwhile, the position of lobbyist registrar, which Giorno also filled, is now open at a time when the city looks for ways to limit influence by corporate interests, especially developers, on important decisions, such as land use.



Update: Taxpayers on the hook for Linda Jeffrey's and departing councillors' rich retirement package

Update: Taxpayers on the hook for Linda Jeffrey's and departing councillors' rich retirement package

Long-lived regional councillors are due for hefty pensions after as much as 30 years in office, on top of the unusually large severance payments they voted for themselves while sitting on city council several years ago.

The mayor, after only four years in office, is entitled to a more modest pension. But altogether, departing council members could end up, in the long run, receiving more than $2 million.



Tony Clement began his political career in Brampton — a ‘sexting’ scandal might end it

Tony Clement began his political career in Brampton — a ‘sexting’ scandal might end it

The long-time Conservative politician is dealing with a professional and personal crisis after admitting he sent inappropriate images to a woman. Things are moving fast around the MP and married father of three, as his party leader, Andrew Scheer, asked him on Wednesday to resign from the federal Conservative caucus.

As the news spreads, in an era when political survival after similar scandals has become hard to predict, Clement has made claims of extortion as a motive behind the story, and is now asking for privacy.



With community torn over cannabis new Brampton council will have to make quick decisions

With community torn over cannabis new Brampton council will have to make quick decisions

Brampton City Council will have just 48 days after being sworn in to decide whether to opt out of allowing cannabis retail stores in the city, which would mean turning down potential revenues in favour of waiting to see what impact legalization will have on community health and safety.

The short timeline, which follows the Doug Ford government’s decision to move away from LCBO-like regulation to allowing private retail sales, will mean a council with five new members will need to grapple quickly with a host of issues — and some sharply differing opinions among its constituents.



As Trudeau announces plan for 350,000 immigrants a year, Brampton MP says ‘buck stops at council’ to fund growth

As Trudeau announces plan for 350,000 immigrants a year, Brampton MP says ‘buck stops at council’ to fund growth

More than 50 percent of Brampton’s residents were born outside Canada. With the federal government’s announcement that it plans to welcome 350,000 newcomers into the country annually as of 2021 — the highest level in the modern era — city officials wonder how Ottawa plans to help the municipality, where a disproportionate number of immigrants settle.

The city’s finances are already stretched, hospitals are beyond capacity, affordable housing is vastly underfunded, and other services aren’t keeping up. A local Liberal MP, Raj Grewal, says city council needs to do a better job of advocating for Brampton’s needs.



The Pittsburgh mass murder and Donald Trump won’t bend Lawrie Bloom and Brampton’s Har Tikvah Synagogue

The Pittsburgh mass murder and Donald Trump won’t bend Lawrie Bloom and Brampton’s Har Tikvah Synagogue

Within Brampton's diverse mix of faith groups, one of the city's smallest religious communities offers inspiration to all, even as many of its members fear a return to darker days.

The impact of events south of the border, as nationalism gets stoked by politicians and those using it as a way to deal with economic hardship, is being felt right here in Brampton.  



Special council meeting offers no concrete solution to Ford government’s $90M campus funding cut

Special council meeting offers no concrete solution to Ford government’s $90M campus funding cut

Brampton City Council and Ryerson University representatives gathered Friday for a special meeting to consider next steps after the province pulled out of a $90-million commitment for a satellite campus in the city.

While optimism was expressed about the project going ahead on schedule, it remains unclear where the missing money will come from and if the location chosen by the previous provincial government will be changed.

Notably absent from the council meeting were Brampton’s two Progressive Conservative MPPs, who were invited after defending their government’s decision to cut the funding.



Provincial bill to end higher auto-insurance rates in Brampton defeated

Provincial bill to end higher auto-insurance rates in Brampton defeated

Brampton car owners pay an average of $2,268 annually for insurance, 70 percent more than the provincial average. Critics say many insurance providers discriminate against the city’s drivers and use postal code data to target areas where rates are hiked dramatically.

But a move Thursday by Brampton NDP MPP Gurratan Singh inside Queen’s Park to end the practice was voted down by the ruling PC government, which favours a plan by one of its MPPs to reduce rates that could still be passed. Critics of that plan say it will not end postcode discrimination in Brampton.



Familiar faces, rivalries to define regional chair race

Familiar faces, rivalries to define regional chair race

An appointment to the position of Peel Region chair is still more than a month away, but speculation is swirling about the potential candidates. The decision of who will serve, which the new council will make on Dec. 6, could set the tone inside Peel Region chambers for the next four years.

Will Linda Jeffrey throw her hat into the ring? Will Mississauga, with its heavy vote count, insist on a Mississauga candidate? Will Brampton councillors who backed Patrick Brown get a boost?

Either way, with Brampton looking for more seats at the table—and more clout—and Mississauga’s mayor wanting to pull out of Peel altogether, the chosen chair could be in for a rocky ride.



Taxpayers on the hook for $730,000 severance for 4 retiring councillors

Taxpayers on the hook for $730,000 severance for 4 retiring councillors

Four retiring city councillors together stand to receive close to $730,000 from taxpayer-funded severance as they leave office this fall.

Gael Miles, Elaine Moore, John Sprovieri and Grant Gibson are entitled to one month’s salary for every year served at city council, up to 18 months — an extremely generous cap that the four voted for themselves back in 2013 under Susan Fennell’s leadership, despite a consultant’s report that showed the average severance paid by municipalities is 5.5 months.

According to the formula, each could receive nearly $127,000 from the city and a further $56,000 from Peel Region, which caps payouts at 12 months.



Election over, the next big challenge is getting citizens to care

Election over, the next big challenge is getting citizens to care

Despite this year’s high-profile municipal election, voter turnout was down in Brampton, to an embarrassing 34.5 percent. That should prompt new mayor Patrick Brown to look for ways to nurture the political engagement of Bramptonians when it comes to the day-to-day issues that matter most.

The Pointer takes a look at the ups and downs of political turnout in Peel Region and the GTA, and some suggested solutions to the widespread attitude of “I don’t know and I don’t care” when it comes to municipal politics.



Peel residents on board with province taking the wheel on transit

Peel residents on board with province taking the wheel on transit

A survey conducted by Toronto Region Board of Trade shows that a large majority of residents of the GTA-Hamilton-Waterloo region think a proposal for consolidating transit systems under a single entity — dubbed “Superlinx” — makes sense.

The board’s president says the current system, which sends municipalities begging to higher governments for transit money, hasn’t worked, so it makes sense to send decisions to a body “where growth revenues, planning authority, and financing capacity already exist.” Some 87 percent of the Peel Region residents who took part in the board’s online panel agreed that the idea has merit.

But what happens when Brampton’s needs are pitted against, say, Scarborough’s remains an open question.



Councillors had concerns about city hall extension: $205M cost; too close to street; taxpayers paying for delays; and $3M charge

Councillors had concerns about city hall extension: $205M cost; too close to street; taxpayers paying for delays; and $3M charge

The trial for a $28.5 million lawsuit still hanging over the city heard from three retiring Brampton councillors, who testified that a number of issues around a controversial $500 million downtown development deal raised red flags.

The $205 million price of the city hall expansion, costs that should have been paid by the builder for a 377-day delay and a building that is too close to the street were some of the issues they addressed during the trial that wrapped up last month.



Ontario PCs quash motion to restore funding for university campuses in Brampton, Milton and Markham

Ontario PCs quash motion to restore funding for university campuses in Brampton, Milton and Markham

After Premier Doug Ford's shocking decision last week, Opposition Leader Andrea Horwath’s move to put the money for Brampton’s Ryerson University campus and two others in the GTA back into the coming year’s provincial budget goes down to defeat in the legislature Monday.

Brampton’s two PC MPPs, Amarjot Sandhu (Brampton West) and Prabmeet Sarkaria (Brampton South), were notably absent from the vote, after leaving the chamber shortly before the decision.



A fight for religious freedom on the open road

A fight for religious freedom on the open road

The traditional turban, which Sikh motorcyclists want to wear instead of a helmet, has a long and noble history as a symbol of the faith. Many consider it an indispensable and defining part of their identity.

An Ontario private member’s bill introduced by a Brampton MPP may finally succeed in bringing the province in line with other jurisdictions that have exempted observant Sikhs from helmet laws.



Brampton’s enormous potential won’t be stopped by higher levels of government, but they should pay a price for ignoring it

Brampton’s enormous potential won’t be stopped by higher levels of government, but they should pay a price for ignoring it

Doug Ford’s short-sighted decision to cancel funding for Brampton’s first full university campus won’t stymie the energy and ideas of young students and entrepreneurs determined to become the best they can be, both academically and economically.

But with all that Brampton represents and contributes to the provincial and federal governments, instead of using it as the launch-pad for their political parties’ election campaigns, they need to make investments to move the community forward.



UPDATE: Two key pieces of provincial legislation affecting Brampton

UPDATE: Two key pieces of provincial legislation affecting Brampton

Brampton MPPs have been busy inside Queen's Park as a pair of bills hit the floor touching on issues very close to the city. 

Motivated by lobbying from the Sikh Motorcycle Club of Ontario, Prabmeet Sarkaria (Brampton South) tabled a bill earlier this month—with club members present—that would exempt turban-wearing Sikh motorcyclists from the helmet requirement. That bill arrived on the floor for second reading earlier this week receiving discussion and support from both sides of the aisle. 

At the same time MPP Gurratan Singh brought forward his own bill looking to tackle Brampton's sky-high auto insurance rates. 



Brampton’s PC MPPs break silence on university funding, minister stonewalls NDP on cost of cancellation

Brampton’s PC MPPs break silence on university funding, minister stonewalls NDP on cost of cancellation

The PC government’s universities minister had no answer Thursday to pointed questions about how much money had already been sunk into three university campus projects before their provincial funding was abruptly cancelled this week.

A City of Brampton official said its planned Ryerson University campus and an accompanying innovation centre project will move forward, though it’s not clear how it will make up the $90 million contribution promised by the previous government.

The city’s two PC MPPs are echoing the party line, claiming a budget deficit made the cuts necessary, despite projections that the campuses would be huge revenue generators.



Andrea Horwath, Brampton's opposition MPPs call out Ford government on cancelled campus funding

Andrea Horwath, Brampton's opposition MPPs call out Ford government on cancelled campus funding

Brampton’s two Tory MPPs remained silent Wednesday on the loss of $90 million promised for a Ryerson University campus in the city—cancelled within a day of Patrick Brown’s win in the mayoral election. Meanwhile, inside Queen's Park NDP leader Andrea Horwath and three Brampton NDP members of the legislature were calling the move myopic and disastrous for the city’s economic plans.

The Doug Ford government claims the money promised by the former Liberal government—and cheered recently by some Tory MPPs whose constituents stood to gain a new campus—was too much for the province’s strained budget.



Updated: Brampton councillors say they will pursue ideas for university funding after Ford's $90M claw-back

Updated: Brampton councillors say they will pursue ideas for university funding after Ford's $90M claw-back

After Doug Ford's government made its shocking announcement Tuesday night, pulling $90 million in funding for a new Brampton university campus that had been approved by the previous Liberal government, councillors say they are committed to finding alternative ways to pay for the project. 

Critics of the decision to pull the provincial funding say the university would be a huge economic benefit for the city, and that the project is far too important to abandon.



For Linda Jeffrey, a bitter four-point loss

For Linda Jeffrey, a bitter four-point loss

“It’s not the Brampton I thought I knew,” one-term mayor Linda Jeffrey said Monday night in expressing her disappointment at the surprising ascendancy of her late rival in the race, former PC leader and newly repatriated Bramptonite Patrick Brown.

Jeffrey replaced a controversy-plagued mayor with promises to straighten out the financial mess at city hall. Despite her early successes at doing just that, she stumbled when it came to solving the bigger problem: a fractious council whose squabbling left residents disillusioned with her leadership. On Monday, voters opted, however narrowly, to give Brown a chance to do better.



Redemption in Brampton: Brown takes mayoralty with a 4-point win

Redemption in Brampton: Brown takes mayoralty with a 4-point win

In stunning fashion, Patrick Brown completes a spectacular political comeback, defeating incumbent Linda Jeffrey to become Brampton’s next mayor. Some 44 percent of the vote was enough to seal the deal, completing a campaign that has been both divisive and a clear view into the issues affecting the city.

In a victory speech before a cheering crowd, Brown recounted a number of these issues, while also delivering his message for the future.



New council emerges after wild election night

New council emerges after wild election night

Charmaine Williams, seen here, is one of the new Brampton councillors who will lead the city. While attention was focused on the Brown-Jeffrey matchup as the election drew to a close Monday night, there were exciting changes happening at the ward level.

Four fresh faces on council, boosting diversity at city hall, and a new mayor may significantly change the dynamic in the coming four years — if old divisions on issues such as transit don’t begin to play out all over again.



Now that he’s won, Patrick Brown has the chance to make all the right moves

Now that he’s won, Patrick Brown has the chance to make all the right moves

Can Patrick Brown rise above the petty political in-fighting that has ruined the chance to rule by the last two mayors in office, and find common ground? Can he set aside campaign nastiness for the kind of teamwork that made a couple of people named Davis so successful in their political and sporting lives? He will answer these questions very soon after his impressive win that makes him the 51st mayor in the history of Brampton.

One possible move, involving his recently vanquished opponent, could be a win-win for everyone, especially for the city.



A changing dynamic: does Brampton council need more diverse voices?

A changing dynamic: does Brampton council need more diverse voices?

Of Brampton's and Mississauga's 23 elected municipal representatives, only one is a visible minority. That  should be shocking, considering that about 65 percent of the cities' residents identify as a visible minority. But it’s actually all too familiar. The lack of corresponding ethnic representation on councils across the GTA is an issue minority communities and civic activists have been raising for years.

With Brampton’s population growing at three times the national average, the future will bring a growing list of diverse needs. Is it perhaps time to take this issue seriously in deciding how we vote?

 



Hopefully, Monday’s election will lead to the type of ‘creative destruction’ Brampton so sorely needs

Hopefully, Monday’s election will lead to the type of ‘creative destruction’ Brampton so sorely needs

Brampton citizens and the leaders they are set to elect must show a burning desire to move away from the destructive forces that have held this city back since it was reformed after the installation of regional government in the early 1970s.

Since then, a series of clashes and long-held grudges have defined the lack of leadership that has kept Brampton from reaching its potential.



Unstereotypical election challengers take their passion to Brampton’s streets

Unstereotypical election challengers take their passion to Brampton’s streets

It's an unfortunate reality that municipal elections tend to favour the status quo, for the simple reason that incumbents possess the name recognition, the connections and often the leg-up on fundraising that typically lead to success. 

For newcomers, especially those who violate most elements of the political stereotype — older, white, male, and well-connected — the path to election is much more difficult. 

Yet, there are challengers, willing to take a risk and prepared to burn shoe leather going door-to-door in hopes of becoming a game-changer.

The Pointer takes a look at one such candidate. 



Brampton’s healthcare crisis spills onto floor of legislature: Ford, local PC MPPs absent for vote as motion for a third hospital loses

Brampton’s healthcare crisis spills onto floor of legislature: Ford, local PC MPPs absent for vote as motion for a third hospital loses

Brampton’s growing healthcare crisis was front and centre in the provincial legislature Tuesday as members hurled accusations at each other over the failure to adequately care for patients in the city.

After stories were told of city residents languishing in hospital hallways at Brampton Civic, NDP leader Andrea Horwath, supported by three of her party’s Brampton MPPs, failed to push through a motion to fund a third hospital in the city. Premier Doug Ford and Brampton’s two PC MPPs did not show up for the vote.

The debate became deeply divisive, with MPPs attacking each other over who is responsible for the desperate conditions inside the city's only full-service hospital.



Brown and Jeffrey are tied. New poll shows the former Ontario PC leader has caught the incumbent in the race to be Brampton’s next mayor  

Brown and Jeffrey are tied. New poll shows the former Ontario PC leader has caught the incumbent in the race to be Brampton’s next mayor 

A poll by Forum Research published exclusively by The Pointer shows Patrick Brown and Linda Jeffrey are in a dead heat just days before Monday’s election. Forum surveyed 647 eligible voters in the city Thursday.

Brown was eight points behind Jeffrey, but in a little less than two months his dizzying campaign has managed to pull him even. Voter turnout, depending on which side can more effectively pull supporters to the polls, could determine Monday's result.



New bill aims to cut sky-high auto insurance rates in Brampton, currently 70 percent higher than Ontario average

New bill aims to cut sky-high auto insurance rates in Brampton, currently 70 percent higher than Ontario average

It’s not a secret to Brampton drivers that they’re forced to pay some of the highest auto insurance rates in the country. Some blame high rates of fraud and high-speed collisions that increase the cost of claims in the Brampton area—which end up costing everyone who lives in certain postal codes as much as $1,000 more per year than drivers in other parts of the GTA. Now, a pair of private member’s bills from two sides of the aisle at Queen’s Park have come forward to address the issue.

Brampton NDP MPP Gurratan Singh introduced a private member's bill Tuesday at Queen's Park. He says he's heard enough talk on the issue, and like the thousands of Brampton drivers desperately seeking action, Singh says it's time the government does something about crippling auto insurance rates in the city.



Cannabis is legal: here’s everything Brampton residents need to know

Cannabis is legal: here’s everything Brampton residents need to know

The City of Brampton, Brampton Fire and Emergency Services and Peel Regional Police gathered Tuesday for a question and answer period to provide one final push of information ahead of the official legalization of cannabis.

As of October 17, the law now allows smoking or vaping pot in a host of places where ordinary cigarette smoking is currently allowed, absent municipal bylaws to place further restrictions on it. Brampton City Council has yet to gather public feedback on the law and its potential impact on the city, never mind deciding what it will do about allowing private pot shops within the city’s borders—which could come as soon as April.

The Pointer breaks down the perspectives of Brampton officials and what legalization may mean for residents of the city.



As India begins deporting Rohingya refugees Andrew Scheer and Brampton candidate skirt issue of country’s appalling human rights record during visit

As India begins deporting Rohingya refugees Andrew Scheer and Brampton candidate skirt issue of country’s appalling human rights record during visit

Ahead of his nine-day trip to India, which is wrapping up, The Pointer asked Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer if he would address with Indian officials the increasing concern being raised by advocacy groups and others about the country’s deplorable human rights record.

Brampton North federal Conservative candidate Arpan Khanna joined Scheer, seen here with Prime Minister Narendra Modi in India, and just like other politicians from the city who travel there, he was silent on the issue of the country’s treatment of women, religious minorities and “lower caste” residents.

But both Scheer and Khanna did take time during the visit to criticize a nearby country’s human rights record.



Jeffrey signals opposition to Vision 2040 transit plan; another showdown on LRT route if re-elected

Jeffrey signals opposition to Vision 2040 transit plan; another showdown on LRT route if re-elected

Incumbent mayor Linda Jeffrey, late in her campaign for re-election, has just released a transit plan for Brampton. It signals that she will again make the Main Street LRT route a key transit priority. 

The current council term became mired in dysfunction when Jeffrey tried and failed to get the Main Street option pushed through shortly after her election. 

Her new set of transit pledges also appear to include a rejection of the plan put forward, and approved unanimously by council, under the comprehensive Vision 2040 document, which outlines how the city should manage its future growth. Jeffrey's new platform could be a sign that, if re-elected, she would scrap much of the transit planning already underway.  



Jeffrey’s latest win in the endorsement battle comes in red, blue and orange

Jeffrey’s latest win in the endorsement battle comes in red, blue and orange

Linda Jeffrey scored a big endorsement victory yesterday as local MPs and MPPs from all three major parties showed across the aisle support for the incumbent mayor. It's a significant sign that Jeffrey would be able to work with both levels of government if re-elected.

The announcement came less than a week after iconic Brampton politician and former Ontario premier Bill Davis threw his support behind Patrick Brown, the former Ontario PC leader who is Jeffrey's main rival in the mayoral race. With a week left before the October 22 municipal election the competition between the two clear front-runners seems too close to call. 



A guide for Brampton voters ahead of the October 22 municipal election: breaking down the big issues

A guide for Brampton voters ahead of the October 22 municipal election: breaking down the big issues

With two clear front-runners in the race to be Brampton's next mayor, here's The Pointer's breakdown of the big issues facing voters and what Linda Jeffrey and Patrick Brown have said about them, ahead of Monday's municipal election.

The Pointer commissioned a poll in late August to find out what's top of mind for Brampton residents. Only 36 percent of eligible voters cast a ballot in 2014, but hopefully a more informed public will mean more people out at the polls, as the city faces a watershed election with many major issues that will determine its future. 



It's time to put Brampton back on track

It's time to put Brampton back on track

Former Ontario PC leader Patrick Brown, who is running to be the next mayor of Brampton, lays out his vision to The Pointer's readers in an op-ed.  



Finding reason and balance in Brampton’s suburban bliss as the threat of climate change looms

Finding reason and balance in Brampton’s suburban bliss as the threat of climate change looms

For generations, the single-family home has been the holy grail of housing: a status symbol that has permeated the societal mindset and created wide, sprawling expanses of suburbia across the GTA, including Brampton. Data shows that the desire to own such a home has been passed on to the millennial generation. Nearly 60 percent of millennials could be on the hunt for a new home in the GTA by 2026.

That desire is on a collision course with the reality painted by the most recent report from the United Nations International Panel on Climate Change. Our way of life needs to change drastically—and fast—if the planet is to avoid catastrophic damage.

A new report from Ryerson University describes one potential solution, but grasping it may involve a massive shift in how we think about what makes a home.



Peel Police Chief Jennifer Evans to step down in January

Peel Police Chief Jennifer Evans to step down in January

Controversial Peel Police Chief Jennifer Evans announced Friday that she will be leaving the force in January. She informed the police board that oversees her of the pending resignation two months after it approved a probe of Evans' conduct by a police watchdog for the bungled investigation into three Mississauga family members who were found dead years apart. 

After battling the board for much of the past four years, over issues such as carding, a practice she has strongly defended, Evans was given a two-year extension last year. But she announced that she will depart early in the coming new year.



Brampton citizens, politicians and experts respond to Ford government plan to exempt Sikh-Canadians from wearing motorcycle helmets

Brampton citizens, politicians and experts respond to Ford government plan to exempt Sikh-Canadians from wearing motorcycle helmets

It's a controversial issue: how do you balance Canadian values and laws protecting religious accommodation with saftey and fairness concerns that surround the Ford government plan to exempt Sikh-Canadians from wearing motorcycle helmets?

Local MPP Prabmeet Sarkaria, a turban-wearing Sikh, was a driving force behind the move announced by Ford in Brampton yesterday. In a place where Sikh-Canadians make up such a huge part of the city's fabric, The Pointer asked citizens here, politicians and experts what they think of the move by Ontario's government. 



Bill Davis throws his support behind Patrick Brown

Bill Davis throws his support behind Patrick Brown

Patrick Brown gets a bump, after former Ontario premier and legendary Brampton politician Bill Davis "officially" showed his support for Brown, incumbent Linda Jeffrey's main rival, at an event Tuesday evening.

In what some are already calling a surprise move, after Davis backed Jeffrey four years ago, the show of support might prove significant in an already close mayoral race between the two clear front-runners.



Andrew Scheer arrives in India; joins list of Brampton/Canadian politicians unwilling to address country’s appalling human rights record

Andrew Scheer arrives in India; joins list of Brampton/Canadian politicians unwilling to address country’s appalling human rights record

The leader of the federal Conservative party is in India on a mission to “repair and strengthen” Canada’s relationship, following a controversial trip early in the year by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

But human rights won't be on the agenda. The Pointer asked Scheer if issues such as the widespread rape of women, attacks against religious minorities and the barbaric treatment of hundreds of millions of India’s “lower caste” residents would be addressed.

As is the case when Brampton politicians and other officials go there, human rights seems to be out of bounds. Canada’s position with India is inconsistent with its stance toward other countries, despite conditions that human rights groups describe as alarming and getting worse.



Meet the Brampton businessman who serves up tasty food while helping predict the next mayor

Meet the Brampton businessman who serves up tasty food while helping predict the next mayor

Jeff Chalmers thinks political engagement is the key to making positive decisions for the city's future. His unscientific polling method, to get people involved, has street cred. In fact, he has literally taken his form of surveying to the streets, in his mobile chrome eatery that serves up food-to-go while gauging the political pulse of the city.

Chalmers wants citizens to get interested in the decision-making process that impacts their daily lives. There's no better way to pull them in than food. With political polling being an inexact science that has, over the years, employed thousands of people and cost millions of dollars, The Pointer asked Chalmers, over a plate of one of his famous dishes, about the latest results from his recent poll, which asked patrons who they would pick in the race to be Brampton's mayor. You might be surprised by what he found.



Linda Jeffrey: Why I want to lead Brampton again

Linda Jeffrey: Why I want to lead Brampton again

An op-ed by incumbent mayor Linda Jeffrey on why she wants Brampton voters to re-elect her in the October 22 municipal election. She makes her case to The Pointer's readers.



It’s time for city leaders to take Brampton’s healthcare crisis seriously

It’s time for city leaders to take Brampton’s healthcare crisis seriously

Ontario’s healthcare dollars should be distributed according to numbers and need. So why has Brampton – one of the fastest growing cities in Canada – been shortchanged, again?

Why isn’t part of the $90 million being handed out by the Ford government at Queen’s Park to help eliminate ‘Hallway Healthcare’ going to the city where the phrase was popularized in the first place?



City’s Conservative MPPs silent on why their government’s plan to fix hallway healthcare ignores Brampton

City’s Conservative MPPs silent on why their government’s plan to fix hallway healthcare ignores Brampton

Bramptonians have been looking to the provincial government for help to solve bottlenecks in the healthcare system that have led to bed shortages and hallway medicine at the city’s only full-service hospital, but it was ignored in a new funding plan announced Wednesday. 

While the Ontario government’s growth targets for Peel Region continue to push Brampton’s population to a breaking point, Queen’s Park seems disconnected from the resulting problems, such as the city’s healthcare crisis.

With more than 4,300 Brampton Civic Hospital patients treated in hallways in 2016 The Pointer asked the two new Progressive Conservative MPPs, Prabmeet Sarkaria and Amarjot Sandhu, how they are representing Brampton’s interests inside their government as the healthcare crisis continues. They didn’t have much to say.



Premier Doug Ford’s healthcare announcement offers next to nothing for Brampton

Premier Doug Ford’s healthcare announcement offers next to nothing for Brampton

No part of Wednesday’s provincial government announcement of $90 million—$10 million less than the Liberal government under Kathleen Wynne offered at the start of the last flu season—will go toward relieving the crisis at overloaded, overcrowded Brampton Civic Hospital, whose rash of “hallway medicine” stories helped turn the problem into a provincial election issue last spring.

Nor is there any indication of how many of the promised extra long-term care beds will come to one of Canada’s fastest-growing cities, whose rapidly expanding healthcare needs and the urgency of fixing them already form a major issue in the upcoming municipal election.



Patrick Brown promises better GO Train service, transit funding to combat increasing traffic congestion

Patrick Brown promises better GO Train service, transit funding to combat increasing traffic congestion

If elected mayor, Patrick Brown pledged during a Thursday morning announcement to ease the city's crippling traffic. His plan touched on many issues Brampton residents have raised for decades, such as securing all-day, two-way GO Train service, but he offered few details about how he will actually achieve the ambitious set of promises he outlined. 

In a recent poll commissioned by The Pointer, reducing traffic congestion was the number one issue respondents chose, when asked what they want council to focus on during the upcoming term. 



For Trudeau, Brampton and all of Canada, free trade is good, especially when we open new doors

For Trudeau, Brampton and all of Canada, free trade is good, especially when we open new doors

The new-look North American free trade agreement fixes some, but not all of the inequities in the original NAFTA, and eases the tensions for the business community in Brampton. But at the macro level, Canada is trying to create a new-style business model that is impervious to American interests and Donald Trump’s bully-boy tactics. The new deal provides motivation for local and national companies to take stock of opportunities around the world, for them and our well-educated, dynamic workforce.



The dirty, sweaty, political life of a municipal councillor as the job description evolves

The dirty, sweaty, political life of a municipal councillor as the job description evolves

In recent weeks, the idea of effective representation has been thrust into the spotlight as Premier Doug Ford took a legislative axe to Toronto City Council. Can 25 people effectively represent almost three million constituents? Municipal councils across the GTA, whose members find their workload growing as the region booms, are struggling with the same question. Nowhere is this more clear than in Brampton, the second fastest growing city in Canada. What do we need here to feel effectively represented by our local elected officials?

Do we want them answering endless calls about snow on sidewalks and the annual pothole hysteria; or do we want them addressing complex urban planning issues and how to handle the challenges of modern policing? Or do we expect them to do it all? Speaking with councillors across the GTA, from Oshawa to Brampton, it’s apparent that people who hold the position often see the role differently.



Disqualified bid was $95M less than the $205M for city hall extension; building is short of promised space, trial hears

Disqualified bid was $95M less than the $205M for city hall extension; building is short of promised space, trial hears

Evidence presented recently at trial by a company that alleges it was unfairly disqualified from a $500-million downtown development deal shows Inzola Group’s bid to build the city hall extension was a little more than half the $205 million being paid by the City of Brampton for the building.  

Evidence also suggests the finished building does not provide the amount of required administrative space detailed in the bid contract for the deal.



Brampton auto workers breathe huge sigh of relief as tentative U.S.-Canada-Mexico trade deal reached

Brampton auto workers breathe huge sigh of relief as tentative U.S.-Canada-Mexico trade deal reached

Thousands of the city’s auto-sector workers were on pins and needles while U.S. President Donald Trump repeatedly threatened tariffs as high as 25 percent on Canadian-made autos, which could have crippled the industry. A new deal officially announced Monday, clears the way for Ontario’s huge auto industry to keep expanding.

News wasn’t as rosy for the agricultural sector, particularly dairy producers, including companies in Brampton. The new deal could see more than $700 million of additional foreign dairy products enter Canada annually.

But the agreement might bring relief to Brampton’s large aluminum and steel sector, which was hit hard by recent U.S. tariffs.



Will Brampton opt into legal marijuana shops? Officials say lots of unanswered questions about legal cannabis

Will Brampton opt into legal marijuana shops? Officials say lots of unanswered questions about legal cannabis

While Ontario Premier Doug Ford doesn’t appear to know where exactly his government will allow legal marijuana to be used once new rules come into effect next month, Brampton officials, including incumbent mayor Linda Jeffrey, aren’t even sure if the city will opt into plans to allow retail outlets next year.

Brampton’s diverse community groups, another council member says, will likely introduce a range of cultural values into what’s sure to be a complex debate on legal marijuana, one the city has not yet even initiated. With other GTA cities vowing to prevent pot sales, will a new council be ready to tackle this major issue?



Raucous debate puts Jeffrey’s struggle on centre stage

Raucous debate puts Jeffrey’s struggle on centre stage

Linda Jeffrey’s hopes to ease into re-election on Oct. 22 were shattered by the late entry onto the ballot of Patrick Brown.   

Jeffrey’s performance during a debate Tuesday, which included pointed attacks on Brown and references to the scandals that got him turfed as Ontario PC leader, often failed to convey the sense of a mayor ready to unite a city desperate for leadership.



This is what downtown Brampton could get if city hall fixes the decades-old flood problem

This is what downtown Brampton could get if city hall fixes the decades-old flood problem

Mississauga’s massive $1.5 billion M City project is just one of many 905 developments that Brampton’s stagnating downtown is missing out on without a firm commitment by city leaders to finally resolve the decades-old downtown flood problem.

Critics say Brampton will struggle to keep up with surrounding cities that are quickly shedding their status as suburban bedroom communities.

While places like Mississauga continue to boom, with constantly rising skylines, Brampton’s downtown remains hampered by strict floodplain restrictions that make it difficult to create a dynamic city centre.



Jeffrey won’t support city consultant’s new LRT plan

Jeffrey won’t support city consultant’s new LRT plan

Incumbent mayor Linda Jeffrey made her stance on the city’s current LRT study quite clear during a boisterous debate at Brampton’s Rose Theatre Tuesday night, calling alternative routes “foolish” and decrying the layout put forward in the ambitious Brampton 2040 Vision plan. 

The debate also saw mud-slinging from all sides with Jeffrey’s main contender Patrick Brown taking the chance to criticize the lack of foresight in Jeffrey’s adamant support for the Main Street route, which council already turned down, while pushing his repeatedly used campaign slogan that Brampton is not getting its fair share. 

  



The ‘Trump Effect’ on the NAFTA negotiations has spilled into the Brampton business community

The ‘Trump Effect’ on the NAFTA negotiations has spilled into the Brampton business community

U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum are already hurting firms in Brampton, and with the possibility of more levies on products such as cars built by Fiat Chrysler here, Donald Trump's anti-NAFTA stance could undermine the future of almost 4,000 workers at the Williams Parkway plant, and others.

With a huge manufacturing base, tens of thousands of Brampton workers could be negatively impacted by a bad trade deal, as the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement remains uncertain. While negotiations continue on the international level, many in the city are keenly aware of how big the stakes are locally.



The heavy lifting on the city's light rail debate

The heavy lifting on the city's light rail debate

With a new council soon making decisions inside city hall, a new provincial government and a new visionary plan for Brampton's future, a proposed Light Rail Transit system is surrounded by uncertainty. After council turned down a provincially funded $1.6-billion route that would have seen an LRT roll right into Brampton’s ageing downtown core, the city must now find alternative ways to get people moving. It could mean big spending on behalf of taxpayers. The Pointer takes a step back and looks at how Brampton arrived at this juncture, and what the future could bring as the population booms and efficient transit becomes even more crucial.

One thing is clear, the city can't afford another four years of council gridlock, largely caused by the LRT debate that dominated the current term.



In Brampton’s mayoral race, the ‘unknowns’ are worth pondering

In Brampton’s mayoral race, the ‘unknowns’ are worth pondering

With alarmingly low voter turnout, municipal elections in Brampton tend to proceed along depressingly predictable lines. Front-runners for the mayor’s job are usually drawn from a list of familiar names at city hall or higher levels of government. But this year a lineup of lesser-known candidates, such as lawyer Wesley Jackson, provides voters with some refreshing insights into alternative viewpoints and passionately conceived ideas about how to make the city stronger, wiser and richer in the things that make for a good life.



The Pointer’s debate breakdown, how each mayoral candidate performed

The Pointer’s debate breakdown, how each mayoral candidate performed

On September 20, The Pointer hosted a mayoral debate for all candidates in partnership with Sheridan College. Incumbent Linda Jeffrey called in sick, opening the floor for the other six registered contestants in the race, ahead of the October 22 municipal election. With a panel of four Brampton citizens asking most of the questions, the lively debate, which ran for more than two hours, offered voters insights about who to pick on the ballot.

To help voters make the important decision, here is The Pointer’s breakdown of each candidate's performance during the recent debate.



Brown impresses after Jeffrey calls in sick for debate

Brown impresses after Jeffrey calls in sick for debate

Linda Jeffrey did not attend Thursday evening's debate for mayoral candidates. In her absence Patrick Brown impressed audience members who frequently applauded the policies and vision for the city he outlined during more than two hours of lively debate at Sheridan College. Five other candidates also took turns introducing themselves to voters, many of them often criticizing Jeffrey, describing her as a failed leader with little support on her own council. 

But Brown was the star of the night, evidenced by the vocal support expressed by many of the approximately 150 people in attendance.



In a watershed election The Pointer’s debate is for the voters of Brampton

In a watershed election The Pointer’s debate is for the voters of Brampton

This evening The Pointer will host a mayoral debate in partnership with Sheridan College, featuring all seven candidates registered for the October 22 municipal election. The Pointer believes it’s a critical time for the city as it faces a number of challenges and opportunities that will define the future of Brampton.

Political debates are a critical part of our democracy. They provide voters the opportunity to see the candidates in action, to get a real sense of how they handle pressure and relate to the citizens they hope to serve. The Pointer welcomes Brampton voters to come and attend this important event.

In this article we are publishing two key questions the election front-runners will be asked during the debate, as well as the criteria The Pointer will use to break down the performance of each candidate afterward.



Brampton council puts city business on hold to campaign for re-election

Brampton council puts city business on hold to campaign for re-election

After city council meetings were cleared off for most of the summer, with Brampton facing an onslaught of serious issues, all meetings have been cancelled from mid-September on to let councillors wrap up their term at city hall and campaign for re-election in the Oct. 22 municipal vote. Meanwhile, pressing issues such as increasing violent crime, choosing a route for an LRT system, funding for desperately needed hospital expansion and a long-term strategy for a new university campus are on the growing list of items awaiting serious council debate and decisions.



PM’s visit offers little on funding to cope with hyper-growth

PM’s visit offers little on funding to cope with hyper-growth

Amid plans to boost federal immigration targets, Brampton faces a newcomer-based population explosion without adequate funding for hospitals, affordable housing, transit and expanded policing. The annual Liberal barbecue attended Saturday by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Brampton’s five Liberal MPs drew politicians, but no promises that help is on the way to fund services related to the city’s growth.



Brampton residents demand public-police partnership to quell rising gun violence 

Brampton residents demand public-police partnership to quell rising gun violence 

Progressive, community-based policing, modern technology, sophisticated intelligence gathering, the cooperation of citizens and a force that reflects the community it serves, are features experts outline to help curb violent crime. 



Chief Evans a no-show as Peel Region ponders rising panic over violent crime

Chief Evans a no-show as Peel Region ponders rising panic over violent crime

With increasing violent crime, public frustration and slow responses from officials, Regional council considers what’s being done as Brampton residents question who’s keeping them safe. 

Peel Police chief Jennifer Evans was not at Thursday’s meeting to answer questions, including those raised by incumbent mayor Linda Jeffrey, who is now fighting her chief rival in the election, Patrick Brown, over who will best deal with crime in the city. 

Some are wondering if their promises are too little, and too late.



City denies bias in development deal that led to $28.5-million lawsuit

City denies bias in development deal that led to $28.5-million lawsuit

In the final day of closing arguments in Inzola Group’s lawsuit against the City of Brampton,  lawyers for the City defended its assertion that the company was rightfully disqualified from bidding on the deal. They attempted to poke holes in the case presented by Inzola’s lawyers and discredited a key witness, in an effort to dispel the cloud surrounding the decision-making process for what was to have been a $500-million downtown redevelopment.



Company disqualified from multimillion-dollar development deal sums up claims of bias in $28.5M lawsuit

Company disqualified from multimillion-dollar development deal sums up claims of bias in $28.5M lawsuit

In the first of two days of final arguments in the case of Inzola Group versus the City of Brampton, lawyers for Inzola delivered their final jabs against the city, summing up evidence of bias and lack of good faith presented throughout this summer’s lengthy trial. The Pointer breaks down Inzola’s final argument, ahead of the city’s final submissions to be delivered Thursday.



He's fought developers and mayors, now he says he's ready to lead his city

He's fought developers and mayors, now he says he's ready to lead his city

John Sprovieri feels politics is best done by those with experience. He’s not even close to the winter of his life, according to him, and says the mayor’s job would be a perfect way to cap thirty years of service to his city.

A chatty, one-on-one interview on a sunny summer morning in August with him ends with a jarring reminder of how vexing life in Brampton circa 2018 can be.



City Hall altered internal documents provided for trial, according to evidence in case for $28M lawsuit

City Hall altered internal documents provided for trial, according to evidence in case for $28M lawsuit

Evidence presented at trial by a company that alleges it was unfairly disqualified from a $500-million downtown development deal indicates some internal documents were altered before and after the company filed suit against the City of Brampton.



Is anyone policing Peel police? Part 2

Is anyone policing Peel police? Part 2

Peel’s police force has been racked with bungled investigations, officer misconduct, including serious charges against some members and problems with racialized communities in the diverse cities it serves. Critics say the force has no interest in being held accountable, and acts as if it’s above the law.



Linda Jeffrey on the seven deadly words in politics

Linda Jeffrey on the seven deadly words in politics

The woman who wants to be mayor again, opens up about her personal triumphs and struggles over three decades in politics, and the challenges of leading a complex city with a bitterly divided council. 

She talks with The Pointer about the disease she battles. And issues such as hyper-growth in the city, crime and her failed LRT plan that have stretched the incumbent mayor for four years. 

Now, as the municipal election looms, she wants voters to let her finish what she’s tried to start.



Don't call it democracy if people won't vote. Brampton needs to decide on its future

It's hard to call it democracy when the vast majority don't care

Those are the numbers that represent the percentage of eligible voters who cast a ballot in each of Brampton’s last three municipal elections held in 2014, 2010 and 2006. So, one third of the city’s residents are deciding how the other two thirds will be governed.



Poll shows public safety is a top issue for Brampton voters. Jeffrey and Brown fighting over who’s toughest on crime

Poll shows it's the concern at the top of mind for Brampton voters. And the two mayoral race frontrunners know it

An exclusive poll commissioned by The Pointer shows that almost a quarter of eligible voters have this one issue at the top of their list of worries heading into the October municipal election.

On Friday, Linda Jeffrey and Patrick Brown, the two leading candidates in the race to be mayor, traded blows over who will best handle the alarming issue.



Is anyone policing Peel police? Concerns mount about officer misconduct

Is anyone policing Peel police? Concerns mount about officer misconduct

With Brampton gripped by a recent crime wave, concerns mount that frequent misconduct in the force is putting public safety at risk.



Who’s telling the truth in a $28M lawsuit hanging over Brampton?

Who’s telling the truth in a $28M lawsuit hanging over Brampton?

Former city hall executives who sat in the same closed-door meetings for a $500M development deal tell court different versions of what happened.



How many people should be allowed to live in one house?

How many people should be allowed to live in one house?

A look at one of the most divisive issues in Brampton. It centres on a sometimes reviled yet arguably necessary form of affordable housing: secondary suites, a.k.a. basement apartments, nanny suites, or additional units. 

With population growth nearly 10 times the national average these suites may be a necessary evil in Brampton. 



Patrick Brown wants redemption, and needs Brampton to deliver it

Patrick Brown wants redemption, and needs Brampton to deliver it

Patrick Brown’s year began with a ten-point lead in the race to become premier. Allegations of sexual misconduct soon followed, and moments later the forced departure from the PC leadership. With his battle for the soul of the conservative movement in Ontario lost, Brown now hopes to cue his political comeback by winning the race for mayor of Brampton.



Linda Jeffrey has single-digit lead over Patrick Brown in race for Brampton mayor’s job

Poll commissioned by The Pointer shows two-person race for Brampton mayor

 

Brampton's is one of the hottest municipal races in the country. A Forum Research poll commissioned by The Pointer reveals the preferences of the city's voters on a host of key issues as mayoral candidates ramp up their campaigns ahead of the Oct. 22 election.  

For the seven week sprint find out how things are shaping up, as residents decide who will steer the country's ninth largest city into the future.