No Bias. No Influence. Just the Facts. For Stories That Matter to Brampton.

The ‘Trump Effect’ on the NAFTA negotiations has spilled into the Brampton business community

The ‘Trump Effect’ on the NAFTA negotiations has spilled into the Brampton business community

U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum are already hurting firms in Brampton, and with the possibility of more levies on products such as cars built by Fiat Chrysler here, Donald Trump's anti-NAFTA stance could undermine the future of almost 4,000 workers at the Williams Parkway plant, and others.

With a huge manufacturing base, tens of thousands of Brampton workers could be negatively impacted by a bad trade deal, as the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement remains uncertain. While negotiations continue on the international level, many in the city are keenly aware of how big the stakes are locally.



The heavy lifting on the city's light rail debate

The heavy lifting on the city's light rail debate

With a new council soon making decisions inside city hall, a new provincial government and a new visionary plan for Brampton's future, a proposed Light Rail Transit system is surrounded by uncertainty. After council turned down a provincially funded $1.6-billion route that would have seen an LRT roll right into Brampton’s ageing downtown core, the city must now find alternative ways to get people moving. It could mean big spending on behalf of taxpayers. The Pointer takes a step back and looks at how Brampton arrived at this juncture, and what the future could bring as the population booms and efficient transit becomes even more crucial.

One thing is clear, the city can't afford another four years of council gridlock, largely caused by the LRT debate that dominated the current term.



In Brampton’s mayoral race, the ‘unknowns’ are worth pondering

In Brampton’s mayoral race, the ‘unknowns’ are worth pondering

With alarmingly low voter turnout, municipal elections in Brampton tend to proceed along depressingly predictable lines. Front-runners for the mayor’s job are usually drawn from a list of familiar names at city hall or higher levels of government. But this year a lineup of lesser-known candidates, such as lawyer Wesley Jackson, provides voters with some refreshing insights into alternative viewpoints and passionately conceived ideas about how to make the city stronger, wiser and richer in the things that make for a good life.



The Pointer’s debate breakdown, how each mayoral candidate performed

The Pointer’s debate breakdown, how each mayoral candidate performed

On September 20, The Pointer hosted a mayoral debate for all candidates in partnership with Sheridan College. Incumbent Linda Jeffrey called in sick, opening the floor for the other six registered contestants in the race, ahead of the October 22 municipal election. With a panel of four Brampton citizens asking most of the questions, the lively debate, which ran for more than two hours, offered voters insights about who to pick on the ballot.

To help voters make the important decision, here is The Pointer’s breakdown of each candidate's performance during the recent debate.



Brown impresses after Jeffrey calls in sick for debate

Brown impresses after Jeffrey calls in sick for debate

Linda Jeffrey did not attend Thursday evening's debate for mayoral candidates. In her absence Patrick Brown impressed audience members who frequently applauded the policies and vision for the city he outlined during more than two hours of lively debate at Sheridan College. Five other candidates also took turns introducing themselves to voters, many of them often criticizing Jeffrey, describing her as a failed leader with little support on her own council. 

But Brown was the star of the night, evidenced by the vocal support expressed by many of the approximately 150 people in attendance.



In a watershed election The Pointer’s debate is for the voters of Brampton

In a watershed election The Pointer’s debate is for the voters of Brampton

This evening The Pointer will host a mayoral debate in partnership with Sheridan College, featuring all seven candidates registered for the October 22 municipal election. The Pointer believes it’s a critical time for the city as it faces a number of challenges and opportunities that will define the future of Brampton.

Political debates are a critical part of our democracy. They provide voters the opportunity to see the candidates in action, to get a real sense of how they handle pressure and relate to the citizens they hope to serve. The Pointer welcomes Brampton voters to come and attend this important event.

In this article we are publishing two key questions the election front-runners will be asked during the debate, as well as the criteria The Pointer will use to break down the performance of each candidate afterward.



Brampton council puts city business on hold to campaign for re-election

Brampton council puts city business on hold to campaign for re-election

After city council meetings were cleared off for most of the summer, with Brampton facing an onslaught of serious issues, all meetings have been cancelled from mid-September on to let councillors wrap up their term at city hall and campaign for re-election in the Oct. 22 municipal vote. Meanwhile, pressing issues such as increasing violent crime, choosing a route for an LRT system, funding for desperately needed hospital expansion and a long-term strategy for a new university campus are on the growing list of items awaiting serious council debate and decisions.



PM’s visit offers little on funding to cope with hyper-growth

PM’s visit offers little on funding to cope with hyper-growth

Amid plans to boost federal immigration targets, Brampton faces a newcomer-based population explosion without adequate funding for hospitals, affordable housing, transit and expanded policing. The annual Liberal barbecue attended Saturday by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Brampton’s five Liberal MPs drew politicians, but no promises that help is on the way to fund services related to the city’s growth.



Brampton residents demand public-police partnership to quell rising gun violence 

Brampton residents demand public-police partnership to quell rising gun violence 

Progressive, community-based policing, modern technology, sophisticated intelligence gathering, the cooperation of citizens and a force that reflects the community it serves, are features experts outline to help curb violent crime. 



Chief Evans a no-show as Peel Region ponders rising panic over violent crime

Chief Evans a no-show as Peel Region ponders rising panic over violent crime

With increasing violent crime, public frustration and slow responses from officials, Regional council considers what’s being done as Brampton residents question who’s keeping them safe. 

Peel Police chief Jennifer Evans was not at Thursday’s meeting to answer questions, including those raised by incumbent mayor Linda Jeffrey, who is now fighting her chief rival in the election, Patrick Brown, over who will best deal with crime in the city. 

Some are wondering if their promises are too little, and too late.



City denies bias in development deal that led to $28.5-million lawsuit

City denies bias in development deal that led to $28.5-million lawsuit

In the final day of closing arguments in Inzola Group’s lawsuit against the City of Brampton,  lawyers for the City defended its assertion that the company was rightfully disqualified from bidding on the deal. They attempted to poke holes in the case presented by Inzola’s lawyers and discredited a key witness, in an effort to dispel the cloud surrounding the decision-making process for what was to have been a $500-million downtown redevelopment.



Company disqualified from multimillion-dollar development deal sums up claims of bias in $28.5M lawsuit

Company disqualified from multimillion-dollar development deal sums up claims of bias in $28.5M lawsuit

In the first of two days of final arguments in the case of Inzola Group versus the City of Brampton, lawyers for Inzola delivered their final jabs against the city, summing up evidence of bias and lack of good faith presented throughout this summer’s lengthy trial. The Pointer breaks down Inzola’s final argument, ahead of the city’s final submissions to be delivered Thursday.



He's fought developers and mayors, now he says he's ready to lead his city

He's fought developers and mayors, now he says he's ready to lead his city

John Sprovieri feels politics is best done by those with experience. He’s not even close to the winter of his life, according to him, and says the mayor’s job would be a perfect way to cap thirty years of service to his city.

A chatty, one-on-one interview on a sunny summer morning in August with him ends with a jarring reminder of how vexing life in Brampton circa 2018 can be.



City Hall altered internal documents provided for trial, according to evidence in case for $28M lawsuit

City Hall altered internal documents provided for trial, according to evidence in case for $28M lawsuit

Evidence presented at trial by a company that alleges it was unfairly disqualified from a $500-million downtown development deal indicates some internal documents were altered before and after the company filed suit against the City of Brampton.



Is anyone policing Peel police? Part 2

Is anyone policing Peel police? Part 2

Peel’s police force has been racked with bungled investigations, officer misconduct, including serious charges against some members and problems with racialized communities in the diverse cities it serves. Critics say the force has no interest in being held accountable, and acts as if it’s above the law.



Linda Jeffrey on the seven deadly words in politics

Linda Jeffrey on the seven deadly words in politics

The woman who wants to be mayor again, opens up about her personal triumphs and struggles over three decades in politics, and the challenges of leading a complex city with a bitterly divided council. 

She talks with The Pointer about the disease she battles. And issues such as hyper-growth in the city, crime and her failed LRT plan that have stretched the incumbent mayor for four years. 

Now, as the municipal election looms, she wants voters to let her finish what she’s tried to start.



Don't call it democracy if people won't vote. Brampton needs to decide on its future

It's hard to call it democracy when the vast majority don't care

Those are the numbers that represent the percentage of eligible voters who cast a ballot in each of Brampton’s last three municipal elections held in 2014, 2010 and 2006. So, one third of the city’s residents are deciding how the other two thirds will be governed.



Poll shows public safety is a top issue for Brampton voters. Jeffrey and Brown fighting over who’s toughest on crime

Poll shows it's the concern at the top of mind for Brampton voters. And the two mayoral race frontrunners know it

An exclusive poll commissioned by The Pointer shows that almost a quarter of eligible voters have this one issue at the top of their list of worries heading into the October municipal election.

On Friday, Linda Jeffrey and Patrick Brown, the two leading candidates in the race to be mayor, traded blows over who will best handle the alarming issue.



Is anyone policing Peel police? Concerns mount about officer misconduct

Is anyone policing Peel police? Concerns mount about officer misconduct

With Brampton gripped by a recent crime wave, concerns mount that frequent misconduct in the force is putting public safety at risk.


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